Minolta MC Tele-Rokkor PF 135/2.8   Mmmmm.... Enamel filled engraving. Keep your printed plastics.

Minolta MC Tele-Rokkor PF 135/2.8   Mmmmm.... Enamel filled engraving. Keep your printed plastics.

        One of my earliest projects for the "That Shouldn't Go There" department, this Minolta lens was picked up for $15, Hoya HMC UV(o) filter, and original leather Minolta case included. How could I pass that up? Upon bringing it back home and prodding around the internet for a Minolta to Nikon F mount adapter, I learned about a little something called "flange to film distance." Essentially, the Nikon flange to film distance is longer than the Minolta flange to film distance by ~4mm. This means that an adapter to seat a Nikon lens to a Minolta body needs to be 4mm thick for the focus ring to operate properly. Any longer, and the lens will not be able to focus on subjects very far away. Any shorter, and the lens will not be able to focus as close to the camera as advertised. Now, the more practiced logicians among you may already see the problem: If the Nikon to Minolta adapter needs to be 4mm thick, then the Minolta to Nikon adapter needs to be -4mm thick. Please allow me to introduce the Nikon Effed mount:

         Some said we couldn't do it. Others said we shouldn't do it. Only one group was correct.

        Some said we couldn't do it. Others said we shouldn't do it. Only one group was correct.

          The Effed(tm) mount was my answer to this problem. First, I removed the old Minolta mount from the lens. Then I chucked the lens on a mill, and removed some "completely unnecessary" structural material, where by "completely unnecessary" I mean "distinctly functional." To top it off, I hand turned and milled the metal totally-an-F-mount-I-swear from some high grade random stock I found lying around the shop. In the end, it actually fit pretty darn well, and can indeed achieve infinity focus. The only down sides to this project were that the Nikon and Minolta aperture rings rotate in the opposite directions, so it would have taken non-zero work to couple the metering prong to the camera, and the massive amount of time it took to produce a knockoff Nikon F mount by hand. The lens image circle works for 35mm film and full frame sensors, so it plays relatively nice with my D810.